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News Roundup: Citizenship would boost economy; equity in education; Q&A with author Myriam Gurba

In the news today: A new report (again) shows that granting citizenship to undocumented immigrants would both raise wages and boost the nation's economy. Making this nation's educational system more equitable is going to take more than just public statements
Daily Kos

News Roundup: Citizenship would boost economy; equity in education; Q&A with author Myriam Gurba

In the news today: A new report (again) shows that granting citizenship to undocumented immigrants would both raise wages and boost the nation's economy. Making this nation's educational system more equitable is going to take more than just public statements. Mean author Myriam Gurba talks about #MeToo, racism, and pandemic America. Here's some of what you may have missed during a mostly peaceful news weekend:

Daily Kos is dedicated to building Community writing, but we need your input

As siab recently pointed out, Community engagement and participation is down. There are myriad reasons for that, and nobody here has pinned it down to just one issue. As the person who leads the Community Contributors team, there’s one way I think we could
Daily Kos

Daily Kos is dedicated to building Community writing, but we need your input

As siab recently pointed out, Community engagement and participation is down. There are myriad reasons for that, and nobody here has pinned it down to just one issue. As the person who leads the Community Contributors team, there’s one way I think we could help. If I’m right, it could have twofold benefit for the Daily Kos Community. My entire job is to help Community writers create more, better content, and help increase that content’s visibility. As such, it deeply pains me when I read comments and stories that insist there’s some broad conspiracy to eliminate that component from our multi-prong offerings as a site—namely News, Action, and Community. In the most simplistic of terms: On the staff side, we deliver news that we hope will kick our Community into action, because when y’all are activated, watch out! With that in mind, we’d like to create a writing workshop for the Community. What could that look like for you?

Joan McCarter on the Michelangelo Signorile Show: 'Bipartisan' senators are courting primaries

This week, Daily Kos senior political writer Joan McCarter joined the Michelangelo Signorile Show to discuss Mitch McConnell's PR strategy to rehabilitate the GOP's public image, how voters might hold Sens. Krysten Sinema and Joe Manchin accoun
Daily Kos

Joan McCarter on the Michelangelo Signorile Show: 'Bipartisan' senators are courting primaries

This week, Daily Kos senior political writer Joan McCarter joined the Michelangelo Signorile Show to discuss Mitch McConnell's PR strategy to rehabilitate the GOP's public image, how voters might hold Sens. Krysten Sinema and Joe Manchin accountable, and what might play out in the 2022 and 2024 elections if Biden is unable to advance his agenda.

It’s going to take more than school board statements to make education more equitable

This story was originally published at Prism.  Since last year’s racial justice uprisings catalyzed another worldwide wave of discussions about institutional racism, public school boards across the United States are being forced to take responsibili
Daily Kos

It’s going to take more than school board statements to make education more equitable

This story was originally published at Prism.  Since last year’s racial justice uprisings catalyzed another worldwide wave of discussions about institutional racism, public school boards across the United States are being forced to take responsibility for their involvement in creating and fostering a divisive, inequitable education system. Now, many of those boards are trying to take aggressive steps to correct those inequities. School boards have a powerful role in shaping the lives and education of tens of millions of students across the country. School boards consist of up to nine elected members who are accountable for the success and performance of the students and teachers in their district. They have the ability to adopt new curricula, hire or fire the superintendent, set school calendars, expand or close schools, approve teacher contracts, establish policies, set budgets, form committees, and much more.

Author Q&A with Myriam Gurba: Bisexual stereotypes, #MeToo movement, and writing about trauma

Myriam Gurba, a Mexican American, bisexual writer and advocate, is first and foremost an expert in her own experiences—as a queer woman of color, as a survivor of abuse, as a survivor of gender-based violence, Gurba knows her story in a way that no one els
Daily Kos

Author Q&A with Myriam Gurba: Bisexual stereotypes, #MeToo movement, and writing about trauma

Myriam Gurba, a Mexican American, bisexual writer and advocate, is first and foremost an expert in her own experiences—as a queer woman of color, as a survivor of abuse, as a survivor of gender-based violence, Gurba knows her story in a way that no one else quite does. As Gurba explained to Daily Kos when she joined us for a phone interview, this type of “expertise” is precisely what people should focus on when it comes to supporting survivors and movements like #MeToo. “In every situation of abuse,” Gurba explains, “and in situations of gendered violence, in particular, the person being victimized is an expert on how to survive because if they are alive, it is to their credit. They have managed to prolong their life under the threat of death.” In her incredible memoir, Mean, Gurba writes about true crime, small towns, and sexual violence with startling and poignant clarity and humor. In her recent publication, Letter to a Bigot, Gurba writes an address to a certain Republican politician in California she believes made many of Trump’s most notorious racist, xenophobic remarks far before he had a national platform in politics. Gurba also offers some advice to fellow artists who are considering turning to art to heal after trauma and points out one very big—and very consistent—issue with national coverage on the COVID-19 pandemic.

Alaska's tri-partisan House coalition is a crazy quilt. We're here to make sense of it

Daily Kos Elections has calculated the 2020 presidential results for every state Senate and state House district in Alaska, where a coalition of Democrats, independents, and dissident Republicans controls the lower chamber. You can find all of our district-le
Daily Kos

Alaska's tri-partisan House coalition is a crazy quilt. We're here to make sense of it

Daily Kos Elections has calculated the 2020 presidential results for every state Senate and state House district in Alaska, where a coalition of Democrats, independents, and dissident Republicans controls the lower chamber. You can find all of our district-level data nationwide at this bookmarkable permalink. While Donald Trump won 53% of the vote in Alaska last year, Joe Biden's 43% was the highest total for Team Blue since 1964, when Lyndon Johnson became the only presidential Democratic candidate to ever carry the state. Trump didn’t come close to losing the Last Frontier, but his comparatively small margin of victory had consequences. Trump won just 21 state House districts to Biden’s 19, a surprisingly bad showing for Team Red; four years earlier, Trump carried 27 constituencies as he was beating Hillary Clinton 53-38 statewide.

Reflective literature in school can encourage reading and improve literacy. Here’s how

This story was originally published at Prism.  By Sravya Tadepalli When Shilpa Thirukkovalur was in high school, only three books throughout her four years of English classes were written by authors of color. Thirukkovalur, who graduated from her Wes
Daily Kos

Reflective literature in school can encourage reading and improve literacy. Here’s how

This story was originally published at Prism.  By Sravya Tadepalli When Shilpa Thirukkovalur was in high school, only three books throughout her four years of English classes were written by authors of color. Thirukkovalur, who graduated from her Westborough, Massachusetts, high school in 2015, rarely saw stories about herself or other people of color uplifted in the school curriculum or assigned literature. “All of my English teachers were white and I don’t remember any meaningful conversations about race,” Thirukkovalur said. “Most of the books we read were the typical high school required reading by white, mostly male authors.”

Exploring the magic of Zion National Park and tips for surviving the crush of the crowds

After nearly a year and half in my home because of COVID-19, I developed a serious travel itch that simply had to be scratched. With the first dose in my arm and with the second dose on the horizon, I realized there just might be a way to trave
Daily Kos

Exploring the magic of Zion National Park and tips for surviving the crush of the crowds

After nearly a year and half in my home because of COVID-19, I developed a serious travel itch that simply had to be scratched. With the first dose in my arm and with the second dose on the horizon, I realized there just might be a way to travel this year and set out to plan an adventure.  What started as a three-day weekend to Sedona turned into a national park adventure hitting six of America’s scenic parks: Grand Canyon, Zion, Bryce, Sequoia, King’s Canyon, and last but certainly not least, Yosemite National Park. And for the record, we never even made it to Sedona. We’ll be saving that for another day. The call to the parks just too strong and so off we went. The Grand Canyon was our first stop and that was more of a Chevy Chase-styled Vacation visit, briefly enjoying the majestic vistas and car turnouts before driving into the Navajo Nation and north toward Utah. We didn’t hike at the Grand Canyon, so I won’t be dwelling on those details and will instead move onto Zion National Park, one of the most interesting and beautiful parks in the world.  If you are one of the anticipated record-breaking 6 million visitors to hit Zion National Park in 2021 or beyond, here are insights and tips for your adventure. 

Citizenship for undocumented immigrants would boost economy and increase wages for all, report shows

Putting the nation's undocumented immigrants on a pathway to citizenship would provide a massive boost to the nation’s economy, increasing the gross domestic product by up to $1.7 trillion over the next decade and creating over 430,000 jobs, the Cente
Daily Kos

Citizenship for undocumented immigrants would boost economy and increase wages for all, report shows

Putting the nation's undocumented immigrants on a pathway to citizenship would provide a massive boost to the nation’s economy, increasing the gross domestic product by up to $1.7 trillion over the next decade and creating over 430,000 jobs, the Center for American Progress and the University of California, Davis’ Global Migration Center said in new findings released this week. ”Poll after poll has illustrated that the vast majority of Americans support putting undocumented immigrants on a pathway to citizenship,” the report said. “And as the nation emerges from the COVID-19 pandemic and looks toward the future, legalization is a key component of a just, equitable, and robust recovery.” While the U.S. Citizenship Act of 2021 would provide the most robust recovery, more targeted immigration bills would also provide significant economic benefits.

Soul food, summer sun, and family reunion tunes for Father's Day

Today is a day with multiple meanings and associated celebrations. It’s Summer Solstice, Father’s Day, and in my family (and perhaps in yours), it is a time for an annual family reunion and soul food cookout, which quite a few folks may actually get to d
Daily Kos

Soul food, summer sun, and family reunion tunes for Father's Day

Today is a day with multiple meanings and associated celebrations. It’s Summer Solstice, Father’s Day, and in my family (and perhaps in yours), it is a time for an annual family reunion and soul food cookout, which quite a few folks may actually get to do this year with their vaccinated relatives and friends. So for today’s #BlackMusicSunday, I’ve got a mixed bag of musical offerings to usher in summertime, honor dads, and whet your appetite for BBQ and all the fixings. 

Community Spotlight: In open threads, we talk all through the day and night

One of the most important things that sets Daily Kos apart from other political news and opinion sites is the Community. We pull together to elect more and better Democrats, supporting campaigns with donations and outreach, teaching activism 101 and «ho
Daily Kos

Community Spotlight: In open threads, we talk all through the day and night

One of the most important things that sets Daily Kos apart from other political news and opinion sites is the Community. We pull together to elect more and better Democrats, supporting campaigns with donations and outreach, teaching activism 101 and «how to» in the Nuts and Bolts of Democratic elections, and in general holding each other to high standards of accuracy and compassion when we set out to accomplish any goal. Then, there's the social part of the Community. We get acquainted, often through Groups where people with shared interests gather and become friends. We appreciate each other; we celebrate each other's milestones and triumphs. And when we grieve, we grieve pretty much together. But what about if you don't want to talk books or nature or politics, or join in a Group discussion? If you want to connect with other Kossacks on a more personal level, the open threads are where you should go. They’re freewheeling comment threads on any sort of topic, and everyone is welcome to join in, either to an established comment thread or to start with a topic of their own.

Ohio Republicans move to ban cheap, fast, and successful municipal broadband programs in the state

Ohio has at least 90 things going against it: Gov. Mike DeWine, 25 state senators, and 64 state representatives are Republican officials with a majority control of the state. That isn’t simply a facetious bit of business. These legislators seem hell-bent o
Daily Kos

Ohio Republicans move to ban cheap, fast, and successful municipal broadband programs in the state

Ohio has at least 90 things going against it: Gov. Mike DeWine, 25 state senators, and 64 state representatives are Republican officials with a majority control of the state. That isn’t simply a facetious bit of business. These legislators seem hell-bent on hurting Ohio citizens’ health and pocketbooks. The public health experts GOP representatives bring into chambers to speak are snake-oil charlatans, and even the former Republican speaker has been expelled for outrageous levels of apparent corruption. The corruption in question led to an unpopular $170 million bailout of failing nuclear and coal power plants, at the expense of renewable energy initiatives. On June 9, a new $75 billion budget passed through the GOP-led Ohio Senate. Members of the Ohio House have criticized the Senate’s handling of the budget, saying it was done haphazardly, without taking into account all of the work and negotiations done by the House. Senate Democrats say that  the House plan, created by a still-majority GOP body of state reps, was considerably more acceptable. With cuts to education, Medicaid administration, and rural broadband grants, the Ohio Senate bill cuts $874 million from the budget while the House bill cut $380 million. But “tucked inside” of the Senate bill are all kinds of predictably screwed up things like backdoor women’s health restrictions on abortion, and doing away with municipal-created broadband infrastructure.

Connect! Unite! Act! Readers and book lovers welcome you to talk about the books you love

Connect! Unite! Act! is a weekly series that seeks to create face-to-face networks in each congressional district. Groups meet regularly to socialize, but also to get out the vote, support candidates, and engage in other local political actions that help our
Daily Kos

Connect! Unite! Act! Readers and book lovers welcome you to talk about the books you love

Connect! Unite! Act! is a weekly series that seeks to create face-to-face networks in each congressional district. Groups meet regularly to socialize, but also to get out the vote, support candidates, and engage in other local political actions that help our progressive movement grow and exert influence on the powers that be. Visit us every week to see how you can get involved! If you’re here at Daily Kos, you likely came for the political view. Once you’re here, though, it’s the community that makes you want to stay. No community can talk about one thing all day, all evening long. We like to get to know each other—kick off our shoes, lean back, and just talk about things that we love. Community Groups at Daily Kos are ideal for exactly that, and every week, Connect! Unite! Act! highlights longstanding and new groups here that make Daily Kos so welcoming of new readers and commenters. This week in looking at our community, I want to talk about one of our oldest and most well-respected community groups: Readers & Book Lovers. 

Michael Cohen claims Trump told him he'd let Don Jr. go to prison before Princess Ivanka

If Donald Trump were on a life raft in the middle of the ocean with Don Jr. and Ivanka, I have no doubt he’d start fricasséeing his firstborn before ever roasting his daughter—or a root vegetable, for that matter. Ivanka may be the only other perso
Daily Kos

Michael Cohen claims Trump told him he'd let Don Jr. go to prison before Princess Ivanka

If Donald Trump were on a life raft in the middle of the ocean with Don Jr. and Ivanka, I have no doubt he’d start fricasséeing his firstborn before ever roasting his daughter—or a root vegetable, for that matter. Ivanka may be the only other person on earth who even registers as human through his rheumy, Adderall-besotted eyes. So naturally it’s no surprise that she’s the one he’d try to keep out of prison—assuming she didn’t have to take the fall for him, that is. According to former Trump lawyer and fixer Michael Cohen—whom I’ve suddenly stopped regarding as a Machiavellian Barney Rubble who occasionally wears shoes, now that he’s on our side—Donald Trump would have no problem choosing one of his kids over the others if it came down to keeping either of them out of stir. And that “one,” of course, is the daughter he infamously said he’d like to date if it weren’t for that danged consanguinity.

Black-owned distillery embraces its workers' union, this week in the war on workers

When workers at Du Nord Craft Spirits decided to form a union, joining UNITE HERE Local 17, the company voluntarily recognized them without any delay and in fact publicized the occasion itself. Du Nord bills itself as the first Black-owned distillery in the U
Daily Kos

Black-owned distillery embraces its workers' union, this week in the war on workers

When workers at Du Nord Craft Spirits decided to form a union, joining UNITE HERE Local 17, the company voluntarily recognized them without any delay and in fact publicized the occasion itself. Du Nord bills itself as the first Black-owned distillery in the United States. “The production staff of Du Nord Craft Spirits chose to form a union because we enjoy and appreciate working here,” the workers said in a statement to the Minneapolis/St. Paul Business Journal. “We have showed up for the company by working through a pandemic, the closure of the cocktail room, an uprising, and committing to work as timelines and job duties fluctuated. The company showed up for us, most recently, by voluntarily recognizing our unionizing effort.” “The workers knew that I would recognize a union,” owner Chris Montana told the Business Journal. Referring to organizing efforts at several other Twin Cities hospitality businesses, he said, “We hadn't had a direct conversation about this unionization effort, but as previous places were unionizing I made very clear that if they decided that that's something they wanted to do, I would recognize it.” Du Nord said he was ready to negotiate. It’s not exactly going to turn around decades of declining union density in the U.S., but good news is nice to have every now and then, right?

Activists are ramping up the fight to bring Asian American history to the classroom

This story was originally published at Prism.  By Jenn Fang For decades, Asian American advocates have fought to establish Asian American and other ethnic studies programs in schools, galvanized by the fact that most Americans still know very li
Daily Kos

Activists are ramping up the fight to bring Asian American history to the classroom

This story was originally published at Prism.  By Jenn Fang For decades, Asian American advocates have fought to establish Asian American and other ethnic studies programs in schools, galvanized by the fact that most Americans still know very little about the Asian American community. But, as a fresh wave of anti-Asian violence grips the United States, the need to improve public awareness of Asian American identity and history has never been greater—and advocates in New England have been taking aggressive action to ensure students at all grade levels have access to it. “While the Common Core does provide a social studies and history framework for K-12 education, the history of the Chinese Exclusion Act and its significance to the U.S. is not included in a majority of the U.S. social studies and history curriculum in K-12 education,” said Dr. Judy Yu, founding director of REACH Education Consulting, in an interview with the Center for Asian American Media.

Cruisin’ with COVID-19: At least eight Royal Caribbean crew test positive despite vaccinations

At the start of the pandemic, multiple cruise lines made headlines for having passengers or crew members on board who tested positive for COVID-19. As a result, the cruise lines were forced to either dock at the nearest port or delay their trips. The struggl
Daily Kos

Cruisin’ with COVID-19: At least eight Royal Caribbean crew test positive despite vaccinations

At the start of the pandemic, multiple cruise lines made headlines for having passengers or crew members on board who tested positive for COVID-19. As a result, the cruise lines were forced to either dock at the nearest port or delay their trips. The struggle continues, with a Royal Caribbean International cruise delaying its inaugural sailing of the Odyssey of the Seas cruise ship after eight crew members tested positive for COVID-19. But the twist is that all eight members who tested positive were vaccinated, officials said Tuesday, according to NBC News. In a statement posted to Facebook Tuesday, President and CEO of Royal Caribbean Michael Bayley said the situation was «two steps forward and one step back.» All crew members were to be fully vaccinated by June 18; however, before the date of departure could arrive, at least eight tested positive, two with mild symptoms and six who were asymptomatic. Bayley noted that the “positive cases were identified after the vaccination was given and before they were fully effective.”

Afternoon news round-up: Because sometimes, it's just too hard to wait until the morning

It’s Juneteenth. It’s a holiday. And most of the stories on DK today just may have been written in advance to address issues that, even if not “breaking news,” are important and ongoing issues of the week. But, unfortunately, the news has refused to s
Daily Kos

Afternoon news round-up: Because sometimes, it's just too hard to wait until the morning

It’s Juneteenth. It’s a holiday. And most of the stories on DK today just may have been written in advance to address issues that, even if not “breaking news,” are important and ongoing issues of the week. But, unfortunately, the news has refused to stop and celebrate this new—but long deserved—federal holiday. So consider this your place to rage against the machine that just will not stop and take a moment to look at the past, hope for the future, and consider the present.  So … here are a few up-to-the-hour outrages that will surely get better coverage in the coming days. A federal judge has decided the CDC can’t require cruise ships to enforce vaccination As The Washington Post reports, U.S. District Judge Steven Merryday has ruled that Centers for Disease Control and Prevention can’t enforce rules that were supposed to require cruise ships in Florida to demonstrate a 95% vaccination rate among passengers and crew. The ruling is being celebrated by Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis and state attorney general Ashley Moody who filed the lawsuit against the CDC. According to DeSantis, this shows that “the CDC has been wrong all along, and they knew it.” Though how the CDC was wrong, or what it was they knew, is apparently known only to those who are now convinced that Trump was “right” about everything during the pandemic. While DeSantis and Moody are cheering and patting each other on the back, it’s not clear that this will actually make any difference. That’s because the cruise industry liked the CDC ruling. The industry is well aware that in light of the Diamond Princess and other COVID-riddled cruises at the start of the outbreak (as well as 1,001 stories of cruise ships overrun with norovirus-fueled digestive nightmares), they are often at the top of the “Things I Won’t Do in a Pandemic” list. It’s likely that the cruise lines will continue to require vaccination, no matter what DeSantis says. Also, the CDC was already in the process of relaxing its rules, and appeared set to reduce them still further. So, while the headlines may be trumpeting this as if it means something, it doesn’t seem that it will affect anything on the ground — except for being another jewel in DeSantis’ “stands up to health science” crown. And in case you’re wondering, the judge was not a Trump appointee. He’s a Bush appointee.

Juneteenth highlights the gap between rhetoric and reality about who’s actually ‘free’ in America

This story was originally published at Prism.  For two and a half years, enslaved Black Americans in Galveston, Texas, were both free and not free. According to the soaring words of the Emancipation Proclamation, as of Jan. 1, 1863, they were “thenc
Daily Kos

Juneteenth highlights the gap between rhetoric and reality about who’s actually ‘free’ in America

This story was originally published at Prism.  For two and a half years, enslaved Black Americans in Galveston, Texas, were both free and not free. According to the soaring words of the Emancipation Proclamation, as of Jan. 1, 1863, they were “thenceforward, and forever free” with the full endorsement of the U.S. government. But until official word arrived in Galveston on June 19, 1865, along with Union soldiers, the lofty rhetoric handed down from on high proved no match for the local, lived experience of enslaved people. Instead, with no one yet enforcing the executive order, enslavers in Galveston maintained their grip on power and enslaved people toiled, lived, fought, hoped, despaired, and died because that years-long gap between freedom in name and freedom in reality was allowed to exist. It’s worth noting that the proclamation itself implicitly acknowledged that freedom on paper and freedom in reality were not the same thing, promising that federal forces wouldn’t get in the way of freed people who took action toward gaining their “actual freedom.” In other words, while President Abraham Lincoln could declare enslaved people in Confederate states to be free, whether Union forces could immediately enforce those words was a separate matter entirely. Thus, as ever, Black folks were on their own in the in-between.

Asian Americans are turning their 'pain into action' as they boost voter turnout

Amid the rise in cases of violence against the Asian American Pacific Islander (AAPI) community, community members have chosen to turn their  “pain into action.” Instead of staying silent as crimes continue to rise at an alarming rate, Asian American
Daily Kos

Asian Americans are turning their 'pain into action' as they boost voter turnout

Amid the rise in cases of violence against the Asian American Pacific Islander (AAPI) community, community members have chosen to turn their  “pain into action.” Instead of staying silent as crimes continue to rise at an alarming rate, Asian Americans across the country are turning up to vote and run for office in record numbers. According to the Pew Research Center, Asian Americans are not only the fastest-growing segment of eligible voters, but they turned out in 2020 more than they had ever done before. Experts attribute the rise in voter turnout to pandemic-related violence against the Asian American community, NBC News reported.

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